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20110722
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
into jens, the best intelligence we've gotten since tora bora that he was in abbottabad pakistan, we acted yuan laal ratly and took h out and appropriately so. we do work through the united nations in a variety of places in order, like on the sanctions regimes, on iran and north korea. but we have, as i said at the outset, really undertake aggressively... you know, the first triple trip obama... president obama tk outside the united states was in april, 2009 was to europe for a set of sum rk teixeiras and then to turkey. and understanding that these rising powers, these relationships are important for problem solving, particularly in a place like the middle east. we have had disagreements with the turks over the last three years. >> rose: what are those disagreements? >> we had a disagreement with the turks over tactics around the iranian sanctions resolution. and they thought... >> rose: this is turkey and brazil together because of their response? >> yes. and we... >> rose: they thought they were doing your bidding, you understand that? >> i understand a lot about it. and... but, in fact
. pakistan? where would you focus your attention? >> pakistan's an important challenge. there's not much we can do about it. we've tried all sorts of things there and nothing seems to work. i would say revitalizing our relationships in asia and the pacific. that's where history the going to be written in the 21st surgeriry. i would say involved there. better relations with ind ka ya with the countries of southeast asia. doing something about our energy situation that we're less vulnerable on vagaries of price and supply that would go a long way. again, i'd focus more at home on competitiveness, on improving our immigration policy. on the quality of our schools. on the quality of our transportation infrastructure and so forth. again, we have got to retore the foundations of american power. that's a prerequisite if we're going to lead in the world either by what we do or our example. >> restoration is the theme. i hope it's the subject of the next book. thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks, andrea. >> it's very provocative richard. >>> a word of warning the images you're about to see is h
of these people, especially in scandinavia have gone to somalia, gone to pakistan, afghanistan, linked up with various jihadist groups, some of them have been trained in bomb making, assassinations, and they've come back. and if there's one thing that worries authorities across the world it's those people who are residents of europe, who have gone overseas and have come back trained and ready to give their lives or to create mayhem. >> how will they go about trying to find out who it is? what will they be looking for right now on the scene? >> one thing we know is that the intelligence agencies have been on the high state of alert for the last nine months. now they're going to pour much more resources into that. who's involved, which mosques may have been basis for militancy, for example. they'll want to find as much forensic evidence from the bomb, its packaging, maybe a vehicle identification number, cttv from the area, all of that will come into place straight away. the most important thing they get is the signature of the bomb or what was -- what it was in, what was carrying it, was i
know, in pakistan helping with bomb strikes. >> his initial reports are accurate? he's talking, as you say, about damage done by the drones. then he sends a piece of video that shows him in the company of a top al qaeda. somebody we've been looking for for a long time, and then the mother load of information. he claims he's now rendered medical services to ayman al zawahiri. correct? >> how clever he was, weaving in between two worlds, the cia and al qaeda and convincing everyone he's on their side. but ultimately, as we discover later, he's actually on al qaeda's side in this elaborate plot, an incredible lure was set up by al qaeda using their own video equipment and knowledge it was set up by al qaeda, using their own video equipment and their own knowledge of how the cia works to create something so attractive that the cia could not possibly say no to it. >> the reason that the cia found him credible, although through the jordanians, and he knew the medical history of zawahiri, and it matched the information we from his egyptian files. and now the objective becomes, let's bring him
talks, and talk to journalist pam constable about her new book on pakistan. i'm judy woodruff. >> lehrer: and i'm jim lehrer. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put i
at the indian subcontinent, the population is 1.4 billion, same as china, which includes bangladesh and pakistan of it. it's a lot of people in a small area, but they're running out of water, particularly in india. they're overpumping their aquefers, their wells are running dry. and they're projected to grow by 1 million people in the years ahead. subsaharan africa has morelan l, but its population is growing very fast, and it doesn't have the resources to develop the productivity of the land fully. so that's the problem there. and the hunger and malnutrition in the world is concentrated in the indian subcontinent and subsaharan africa. >> do you think the rest of the world -- there's been a big call from the u.n. to say, we need to help these people. is there help available in the rest of the world with the economy teetering the way it is? a lot of countries saying we'd like to help. but we just can't. >> if it's just the horn of africa, 10 million people, 12 million people, that's large. if it becomes bigger and affects a number of countries, then it would be scramble time. the question is how
blasts around the world. but those ied blasts, especially in afghanistan and in pakistan may groove to be critical, because again, a bomb maker leaves a signature. most bomb makers continue to make their bombs the same way until they are either killed or caught. so they're going to look to see if this matches any of the information that may be in that very classified u.s. database on bomb makers around the world. wolf? >> when you get more information, let us know, barbara, thank very much. and to our viewer, stand by for all breaking news on the deadly attacks in norway. we're not leaving the story for long. we're watching president obama, trying to pull voters into the debt limit drama as the clock winds down. we're taking a closer look at where the talks stand right now. and the long distance message he's sending republicans. and the people turn against a powerful and feared state legislature who pushed for the toughest immigration laws the nation has ever seen. stay with us. the chevy cruze eco offers an epa estimated 42 miles per gallon on the highway. how does it do that? well
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
, israel, indonesia and pakistan. interestingly enough, 75% of people in egypt said arabs not responsible for 9/11. >> should we cue up some bin laden tapes where he's admitting the entire thing or khali shaikh mohammed talking about how the plot was put together or the video confessions of those suicide -- of the suicide terrorists before they died? i mean, would that help? that's not even a tough question. >> it isn't a tough question. >> yet the disconnect continues to be there. we always hear that, it makes no sense obviously to us here. meanwhile, let's get to your headlines. >> we will indeed. defense lawyers plan to present an insanity defense today in the arkansas murder trial of abdul akim muhammad accused of killing one soldier and wounding another outside an army recruiting station in little rock. muhammad insists he's not insane and claims his actions were justified by the quran. >> a texas man who was kidnapped has been found dead in mexico. police say he was murdered after his family could not pay a $10,000 ransom. he worked as a federal court interpreter in el paso and was
in pakistan just an hour away from islama bad. they raided the congresswoman pound. and in the burst of gun fire, the al qaeda leader was killed and his body buried at sea. as america celebrated and the world wondered about retaliation . >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women who gave their lives against terrorism across the world and pay tribute to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was responsible for 9/11. which was not only a horrific killing of americans but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as a head of a family group of flight 93 put it, we are willing to make an exception in this case. he was evil personified and our world is a better place without him. >> while understanding the satisfaction and elation of those who lost family members on 9/11, my friend agrees that the sober reality is that some things are unchanged by the death of osama bin laden. the threat remains and jihad must be confronted and adequate resources, effective international cooperation
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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